Lipopeptide-based adjuvanting systems

Project Details

The low immunogenicity exhibited by most soluble protein antigens is in general due to the absence of any molecular signatures that are recognised by the immune system as being dangerous. We have developed a method that makes proteins highly immunogenic by using lipopeptides which target the TLR-2 receptor on dendritic cells. These lipopeptides are engineered to associate with native protein antigens which are then capable of inducing robust antibody and CD8+ T cell responses.  The nature of the association between protein and lipopeptide provides a manufacturing advantage by reducing the need for more complex chemical interventions or modifications.

Dendritic cells with internalised protein antigen (green) transported into the cell as a result of its association with lipopeptide. Cells were also stained for MHC Class II (Red) and a stain (blue) specific for the cell nucleus.

Figure 1: Dendritic cells with internalised protein antigen (green) transported into the cell as a result of its association with lipopeptide. Cells were also stained for MHC Class II (Red) and a stain (blue) specific for the cell nucleus.

Researchers

Dr Brendon Chua
Mr Toshiki Sekiya

Research Group

Jackson laboratory: Synthetic vaccine design



Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes

Infection & Immunity, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Therapeutics & Translation



Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact the research group leader.

Department / Centre

Microbiology and Immunology

Unit / Centre

Jackson laboratory: Synthetic vaccine design