Discovering and characterizing new genes involved in innate immunity, tissue injury and fibrosis

Project Details

Monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils are abundant circulating cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and early defence against infectious disease. We have described the networks of genes activated in the acute phase of human monocytes and macrophages in response to a variety of infectious agents. We have comprehensively catalogued the transcript initiation sites of the myeloid transcriptome as part of the international FANTOM5 consortium, including noncoding transcripts such as enhancer-associated eRNAs and miRNAs. Ongoing work in the laboratory is aimed at understanding the role of transcriptional regulators in diversifying phenotypes of activated monocytes and macrophages.

Researchers

Dr Matt Rutar, Research Fellow
Cheng-ta (Edward) Huang, PhD student
Suzanne Butcher, PhD student

Collaborators

FANTOM Consortium (RIKEN Japan)
Professor Mark Walker, University of Queensland
Associate Professor Mikael Boden, University of Queensland
Professor Michael Rehli, University Hospital, Regensburg, Germany
Dr Ruaidhri Carmody, University of Glasgow

Funding

NHMRC Project Grant (2016-17): "The C-type lectin Mincle exemplifies a new mode of sterile inflammation in cardiovascular disease"

ARC Future Fellowship (2015-19): "The Systems Biology of Stem Cells"

Research Opportunities

This research project is available to PhD, Honours students to join as part of their thesis.
Please contact the Research Group Leader to discuss your options.

Research Publications

  • Huang, E and Wells CA. The ground-state of innate immune responsiveness is determined at the interface of genetic, epigenetic and environmental influences. The Journal of Immunology 2014; 193(1):13-9.
  • Andersson R and the FANTOM5 consortium An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues Nature 2014; 507 (7493): 455-461.
  • Forrest ARR, The FANTOM5 consortium. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas. Nature 2014; 507: 462-470.

Research Group

Wells laboratory: Stem cell systems



Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes

Infection & Immunity, Cell Signalling, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease



Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact the research group leader.

Department / Centre

Anatomy and Neuroscience

Unit / Centre

Wells laboratory: Stem cell systems