Other Australian Venomous Snakes

Stephens' banded snake (Hoplocephalus stephensi)

Stephens' banded snake (Hoplocephalus stephensi)
(Photo Timothy N.W. Jackson)

About

The usual coloration is light brown or yellow, with dark bands along the body and dark spots on the head, although longitudinal bands or unbanded forms may also be seen. Average length is approximately 0.6m, maximum 1.0m. It is often found in trees or under bark, and feeds on birds, lizards and small mammals. The young are born alive.

Distribution

This snake is limited to a small area of the coast of southern Queensland and northern New South Wales.

Venom

The venom contains procoagulants and neurotoxins. Serious illnesses and possibly deaths have been associated with envenomation by this species. Tiger snake antivenom is recommended for treatment of envenomations by Stephens' banded snake.

Broad-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bungaroides)

Broad-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bungaroides)
(Photo Timothy N.W. Jackson)

About

This snake is active at night, and is a specialist predator which primarily feed upon geckos, particularly Lesueur's velvet geckos (Amalosia lesueurii) in the Southern parts of its range. The usual habitat is dry and rocky. The head is broad, like that of a python, and it may be confused with the diamond python, which it somewhat resembles.  It is usually black with narrow bands of yellow.  The head is also marked with yellow.  Litters of 8 to 20 are born live.

Distribution

This snake is found in a small area around the outskirts of Sydney and the neighbouring mountains.

Venom

The venom contains neurotoxins and haemotoxins and may cause serious illness. No fatalities have been ascribed to this snake. Tiger snake antivenom may be used to treat envenomation.

Pale-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bitorquatus)

Pale-headed snake (Hoplocephalus bitorquatus)
(Photo Timothy N.W. Jackson)

About

The pale-headed snake hunts at night for small reptiles and usually lives under tree bark. The coloration is mostly light grey or brown, with the broad head spotted with black.  Average length is 0.5m, maximum 0.9m.

Distribution

Distributed over a large area of coastal southern Queensland and northern New South Wales, and westwards to Dubbo and the Atherton tablelands.

Venom

The venom is neurotoxic, although there is little clinical information on its effects in humans. Tiger snake antivenom is recommended if envenomation occurs.

Small-eyed snake (Cryptophis nigrescens)

Small-eyed snake (Cryptophis nigrescens)
(Photo Timothy N.W. Jackson)

About

Also called the eastern small-eyed snake. This snake lives in wooded areas, where is hunts small reptiles or frogs at night. 
The body is slender and usually black or greyish brown. The average length is around 0.5m, with a maximum of 1.2m. Small litters of 2 to 5 young are born live.

Distribution

Widely distributed along the east coast of Australia, from Victoria to Cape York.

Venom

Little is known of the toxicity of this snake's venom, although illnesses have occurred, usually in snake handlers, and one fatality has been associated with a bite from this species. Myotoxicity is a feature of envenomation.